Catholic Answers

Search Articles


Navigation

Search Scans
Scans by volume
Random Article
Login - advanced access

Collections

1,001 Saints
List of Popes
Art Gallery
Map Room
RSS Feeds RSS

Curricula

Apologetics
Art
Catechetics
Christology
Church Hierarchy
Church History - to 1517 A.D.
Education
Ethics
Hagiography - saints
Homiletics - sermons
Mariology - on Mary
Patrology
Philosophy
Religious Orders
Sacred Scripture
Science

Front Matter — Vol I

Title Page
Copyright & Imprimatur
To the Knights of Columbus
Preface
Contributors
Tables of Abbreviations

Site Status

Articles:11,552
Images:42,348
Links:183,872
Updated:  Aug 12, 2013
prev: Vicar Apostolic Vicar Apostolic Vicar-General next: Vicar-General

Vicar Capitular

The administrator of a vacant diocese, elected by a cathedral chapter

High Resolution Scan ———————————

Login or register to access high resolution scans and other advanced features.

Registration is Free!

Errata* for Vicar Capitular:
———————————

Login or register to access the errata and other advanced features.

Registration is Free!


————
* Published by Encyclopedia Press, 1913.


Vicar Capitular, the administrator of a vacant diocese, elected by a cathedral chapter. On the death of a bishop, the canons of a cathedral chapter (where such exists) inherit the episcopal jurisdiction as a body corporate. Within eight days of the vacancy of the see, however, they must meet and constitute a vicar capitular (Conc. Trid., Seas. XXIV, c. xvi, de ref.). If they neglect this duty, the right passes to the metropolitan, or, in case the metropolitan see is in question, to the senior suffragan bishop, or, when the diocese is exempt, to the nearest bishop. In constituting a vicar capitular, a strict form of election need not be followed; but if suffrages are cast, they should be secret, and no one may vote for himself. The vicar chosen should be a doctor or licentiate in canon law if possible, and though a canon is commonly to be chosen yet this is not required for validity.

On his election the vicar succeeds to all the ordinary episcopal jurisdiction that the chapter had inherited, nor can the chapter reserve any part of the jurisdiction to itself, nor constitute only a temporary vicar, nor remove him. Faculties which are committed to bishops by the Holy See for a term of years, pass also to the vicar capitular (S. Off., April 22, 1898), in which are included the powers usually granted for dealing with a certain number of cases (S. Off., May 3, 1899). Canonists usually hold that perpetual delegations to ordinaries, sanctioned by the Council of Trent, pass likewise to the vicar capitular. Faculties, however, which had been granted to the bishop personally are not extended to the vicar. There are, nevertheless, some limitations on the power of a vicar capitular, even as regards ordinary episcopal jurisdiction. Thus, he may not convoke a synod or visit the diocese unless a year has elapsed since these offices were performed. He may not grant indulgences. He should not undertake any new work or engagements that might prejudice the action of the incoming bishop. Hence, during the first year of vacancy, he can promote to sacred orders only those who are obliged to receive that dignity through possession of a benefice. The vicar cannot grant the benefices of free collation, nor may he suppress them and unite them to the cathedral chapter. He may not alienate the goods of the cathedral church or of the episcopal menses. He can, however, grant permission for the alienation of the goods of inferior churches. He can neither begin nor pursue a judicial process concerning the goods or rights of the cathedral church. The vicar cannot give permission for the erection of a new monastery or a new confraternity (S. C. Ind., November 23, 1878). Canonists usually declare that a vicar capitular can receive extern clerics into his diocese, but deny that he can excardinate the home clergy. If. the vicar is in episcopal orders, he can perform all that belongs to the ministry of consecration; otherwise he may invite a bishop from another diocese to exercise such functions. If the vicar die or resign, the chapter must elect another within eight days, but the newly-elect must not be one who has already received the nomination to the vacant see. In case the removal of the vicar capitular becomes necessary, this may be done only by the Holy See. The office of a vicar capitular ceases when the bishop who has been promoted to the diocese presents his letters of appointment to his cathedral chapter. The new bishop has the right of demanding an account from the chapter and vicar capitular of all their acts of administration, and of punishing any dereliction of duty.

WILLIAM H. W. FANNING


discuss this article | send to a friend

Discussion on 'Vicar Capitular'











prev: Vicar Apostolic Vicar Apostolic Vicar-General next: Vicar-General

Report translation problem

*Description: Copy and paste the phrase with the problem or describe how the trascription can be fixed.
  * denotes required field
Severity:

Featured

Art Gallery
Art Gallery

Catholic Q & A


Popular Subjects
Top 20 Questions

Ask A Faith Question

Quotable Catholics RSS

"I am come here to die, being a Catholic, a priest, and a religious man, belonging to the Order of St. Benedict; it was by this same order that England was converted."
-- Mark Barkworth, convert, priest, martyr, Venerable; in comments to the crowd just before he was drawn and quartered at Tyburn on the first Tuesday of Lent, 1601.

Donations

Latest OCE Discussion



Your usage constitutes agreement with User License :: Permissions :: Copyright © 2014, Catholic Answers.
Site last updated Aug 12, 2013