Catholic Answers

Search Articles


Navigation

Search Scans
Scans by volume
Random Article
Login - advanced access

Collections

1,001 Saints
List of Popes
Art Gallery
Map Room
RSS Feeds RSS

Curricula

Apologetics
Art
Catechetics
Christology
Church Hierarchy
Church History - to 1517 A.D.
Education
Ethics
Hagiography - saints
Homiletics - sermons
Mariology - on Mary
Patrology
Philosophy
Religious Orders
Sacred Scripture
Science

Front Matter — Vol I

Title Page
Copyright & Imprimatur
To the Knights of Columbus
Preface
Contributors
Tables of Abbreviations

Site Status

Articles:11,552
Images:42,348
Links:183,872
Updated:  Aug 12, 2013
prev: Uthina Uthina Utilitarianism next: Utilitarianism

Utica

A titular see in Africa Proconsularis

High Resolution Scan ———————————

Login or register to access high resolution scans and other advanced features.

Registration is Free!

Errata* for Utica:
———————————

Login or register to access the errata and other advanced features.

Registration is Free!


————
* Published by Encyclopedia Press, 1913.


Utica, a titular see in Africa Proconsularis. The city was founded by Tyrian colonists at the mouth of the Bagradas River in the vicinity of rich mines, 1110 B.C. or 287 years before Carthage. It had two harbors, and during the Punic wars was the ally rather than the vassal of Carthage. In 212 B.C., it was seized and plundered by the Roman, Ottacilius. After the fall of Carthage, 146 B.C., Utica became the capital of the Roman province of Africa, and was a civitas libera (free city), perhaps even immunis (exempt from taxes). It was here that Cato the Younger, called Cato of Utica, killed himself after his defeat at Thapsus, 46 B.C. Augustus granted the right of citizenship to the inhabitants of Utica, which under Adrian became a colony, under the name of Colonia Julia Aelia Hadriana Augusta Utica, and under Septimius Severus and Caracalla, a colonia juris italici. When Carthage again became the capital of Roman Africa, Utica passed to the second rank. On August 24, 258 A.D., more than 153 martyrs, according to Saint Augustine, and according to Prudentius about 300, suffered for the Faith at Utica; they are known under the name of Massa candida, and later a basilica was built there in their honor (Monceaux, "Histoire litteraire de l'Afrique Chretienne", II, 141-147). A number of bishops are mentioned by historians (Morcelli, "Africa Christiana", I, 362, II, 150; Gams, "Series Episeoporum", I, 470; Toulotte, "Geographie de l'Afrique Chretienne, Proconsulaire", 318-323). The oldest-known bishop, Aurelius, was present at the Council of Carthage, 256; the last, Potentinus, in 684, at the Council of Toledo in Spain, where he had taken refuge after the Arab invasion. This invasion and the choking up of its harbors with sand washed in by the Bagradas, hastened the down-fall of Utica. Its ruins are at Bou-Chateur, not far from Porto-Farina, with which it is sometimes wrongly confounded. One may see here large reservoirs, an amphitheatre, and some remains of a wall.

S. VAILHE


discuss this article | send to a friend

Discussion on 'Utica'











prev: Uthina Uthina Utilitarianism next: Utilitarianism

Report translation problem

*Description: Copy and paste the phrase with the problem or describe how the trascription can be fixed.
  * denotes required field
Severity:

Featured

Art Gallery
Art Gallery

Catholic Q & A


Popular Subjects
Top 20 Questions

Ask A Faith Question

Quotable Catholics RSS

"I am alone with God."
-- Herbert Goldsmith Squiers, U.S. Army officer, diplomat in China, Cuba, and Panama; his last words upon receiving the last rites.

Donations

Latest OCE Discussion



Your usage constitutes agreement with User License :: Permissions :: Copyright © 2014, Catholic Answers.
Site last updated Aug 12, 2013