Catholic Answers

Search Articles


Navigation

Search Scans
Scans by volume
Random Article
Login - advanced access

Collections

1,001 Saints
List of Popes
Art Gallery
Map Room
RSS Feeds RSS

Curricula

Apologetics
Art
Catechetics
Christology
Church Hierarchy
Church History - to 1517 A.D.
Education
Ethics
Hagiography - saints
Homiletics - sermons
Mariology - on Mary
Patrology
Philosophy
Religious Orders
Sacred Scripture
Science

Front Matter — Vol I

Title Page
Copyright & Imprimatur
To the Knights of Columbus
Preface
Contributors
Tables of Abbreviations

Site Status

Articles:11,552
Images:42,348
Links:183,872
Updated:  Aug 12, 2013
prev: Arnauld Arnauld Arni Thorlaksson next: Arni Thorlaksson

Thomas Augustine Arne

English composer (1710-1778)

High Resolution Scan ———————————

Login or register to access high resolution scans and other advanced features.

Registration is Free!

Errata* for Thomas Augustine Arne:
———————————

Login or register to access the errata and other advanced features.

Registration is Free!


————
* Published by Encyclopedia Press, 1913.


Arne, THOMAS AUGUSTINE, an English composer, b. March 12, 1710, at London; d. March 5, 1778. Although of Catholic parentage, he was educated at Eton, and was apprenticed in a solicitor's office for three years. In 1740 he married Cecilia Young, oldest daughter of Charles Young, organist of All Hallows, Barking, a pupil of Geminiani and one of the best singers of her day. Arne wrote the music for Thomson and Mallet's masque of "Alfred", to celebrate the anniversary of the accession of the House of Hanover. It is in this work the well known "Rule Britannia" occurs. In 1742 Arne went to Ireland, and during his sojourn there produced his oratorio "Abel" and his operas "Britannia" and "Comus" with great success. On his return, he was engaged again as composer at Drury Lane, and in 1745, in the same capacity at Vauxhall, Ranelagh, and Marylebone Gardens. The University of Oxford conferred the degree of Doctor of Music on Arne, July 6, 1759. Three years after this, he wrote "Artaxerxes", an opera in the Italian manner, with recitative but no spoken dialogue, taking the text of Metastasio's "Artaserse". In 1764, Doctor Arne produced his second oratorio," Judith". His later productions were the music for Mason's tragedies of "Elfrida" and "Caractacus", additions to Purcell's music for "King Arthur", and some music for Garrick's ode for the Shakespeare Jubilee in 1769. Arne was buried in the Church of St. Paul, in Covent Garden. He was the first to introduce female voices into the choruses of oratorios.

JOHN J. A' BECKET


discuss this article | send to a friend

Discussion on 'Thomas Augustine Arne'











prev: Arnauld Arnauld Arni Thorlaksson next: Arni Thorlaksson

Report translation problem

*Description: Copy and paste the phrase with the problem or describe how the trascription can be fixed.
  * denotes required field
Severity:

Featured

Art Gallery
Art Gallery

Catholic Q & A


Popular Subjects
Top 20 Questions

Ask A Faith Question

Quotable Catholics RSS

"The Majesty of God is greater."
-- Thomas Woodhouse, Blessed, priest and English martyr; to his examiners who had just described the majesty of Queen Elizabeth as "great"; he was then sentenced to death and disemboweled alive.

Donations

Latest OCE Discussion



Your usage constitutes agreement with User License :: Permissions :: Copyright © 2014, Catholic Answers.
Site last updated Aug 12, 2013