Catholic Answers

Search Articles


Navigation

Search Scans
Scans by volume
Random Article
Login - advanced access

Collections

1,001 Saints
List of Popes
Art Gallery
Map Room
RSS Feeds RSS

Curricula

Apologetics
Art
Catechetics
Christology
Church Hierarchy
Church History - to 1517 A.D.
Education
Ethics
Hagiography - saints
Homiletics - sermons
Mariology - on Mary
Patrology
Philosophy
Religious Orders
Sacred Scripture
Science

Front Matter — Vol I

Title Page
Copyright & Imprimatur
To the Knights of Columbus
Preface
Contributors
Tables of Abbreviations

Site Status

Articles:11,552
Images:42,348
Links:183,872
Updated:  Aug 12, 2013
prev: Theodorus Lector Theodorus Lector Theodosius I next: Theodosius I

Theodosiopolis

A. titular metropolitan see of Thracia Prima

High Resolution Scan ———————————

Login or register to access high resolution scans and other advanced features.

Registration is Free!

Errata* for Theodosiopolis:
———————————

Login or register to access the errata and other advanced features.

Registration is Free!


————
* Published by Encyclopedia Press, 1913.


Theodosiopolis, a. titular metropolitan see of Thracia Prima. In the beginning the city was called Apros, or preferably Aproi; later in its history it became known as the Colonia Claudia Aprensis (Ptolemy, "Geographia", vol. III, cap. xi, p. 7). In the fourth century, according to Ammianus Marcellinus (XXVII, iv, 12), it was the principal city of the country south of Heraclea. The official name of Theodosiopolis, which was given to the city by either Theodosius I, or Theodosius II, was rarely used; it was commonly called Apros. At first suffragan episcopal see of Heraclea in the European province, Apros had already in 640 been elevated to an autocephalous archiepiscopal see (Gelzer, "Ungedruckte...Texte der Notitiae episcopatuum", 535), which title it still retained in 1170. However in 1179, Romanus signs himself as Metropolitan of Apros, and the "Notitia episcopatuum" of Manuel I Comnenus, which dates from this same epoch, also refers to Apros as a metropolitan see (Gelzer, op. cit., 587). This see must have disappeared at the end of the fourteenth century, or in the beginning of the fifteenth century, for in the "Notitiae" subsequent to 1453 no mention of it is to be found. Le Quien, "Oriens christianus", I, 1125-1128, makes special mention of eleven bishops belonging to this see among whom are Babylas in 458; Andreas in 536; John in 787; Sabbas in 878; and in 1351, Gabriel, the last one known. From 1204, as long as the city remained in the hands of the Crusaders, Apros was a Roman archdiocese; in 1244 it was already a titular archbishopric (Eubel, "Hierarchia catholica medii nevi", I, 94; II, 101). Under the Franks, who called it Naples, Apros belonged to Theodosius Branas, the Greek, who had married Agnes, sister of King Philip Augustus. The Bulgarians took the city and destroyed it in 1205; later it fell anew under the sway of the Franks and the Greeks (Villehardouin, ed. Wailly, 390-91, 403, 413-15, 564). The exact situation of Apros is not known; Tomaschek, "Zur Kunde der Hiemus-Halbinsel", 52, identifies it with Kestridje on the Podja-Dere, south of Haireboli in the sanjak of Rodosto.

S. VAILHE


discuss this article | send to a friend

Discussion on 'Theodosiopolis'











prev: Theodorus Lector Theodorus Lector Theodosius I next: Theodosius I

Report translation problem

*Description: Copy and paste the phrase with the problem or describe how the trascription can be fixed.
  * denotes required field
Severity:

Featured

Art Gallery
Art Gallery

Catholic Q & A


Popular Subjects
Top 20 Questions

Ask A Faith Question

Quotable Catholics RSS

"I have loved justice and hated iniquity, therefore I die in exile."
-- Pope Gregory VII, Saint, ecclesial reformer; wielding only truth, he battled armies and an emperor.

Donations

Latest OCE Discussion



Your usage constitutes agreement with User License :: Permissions :: Copyright © 2014, Catholic Answers.
Site last updated Aug 12, 2013