Catholic Answers

Search Articles


Navigation

Search Scans
Scans by volume
Random Article
Login - advanced access

Collections

1,001 Saints
List of Popes
Art Gallery
Map Room
RSS Feeds RSS

Curricula

Apologetics
Art
Catechetics
Christology
Church Hierarchy
Church History - to 1517 A.D.
Education
Ethics
Hagiography - saints
Homiletics - sermons
Mariology - on Mary
Patrology
Philosophy
Religious Orders
Sacred Scripture
Science

Front Matter — Vol I

Title Page
Copyright & Imprimatur
To the Knights of Columbus
Preface
Contributors
Tables of Abbreviations

Site Status

Articles:11,552
Images:42,348
Links:183,872
Updated:  Aug 12, 2013
prev: Schwenckfeldians Schwenckfeldians Science and the Church next: Science and the Church

Moritz von Schwind

Painter, b. at Vienna, 1804; d.at Munich, 1871

High Resolution Scan ———————————

Login or register to access high resolution scans and other advanced features.

Registration is Free!

Errata* for Moritz von Schwind:
———————————

Login or register to access the errata and other advanced features.

Registration is Free!


————
* Published by Encyclopedia Press, 1913.


Schwind, MORITZ VON, b. at Vienna, 1804; d. at Munich, 1871. A painter possessing an inexhaustible wealth of ideas, specially gifted for incisive individualization, and perfectly familiar with the entire range of tones and the power of expression by mien, movement, pose, and costume, he was one of the ornaments of the Munich school of art. He was above all a draughtsman and painter of small details, understanding how to make small pictures harmonious both in color and composition. He was by nature inclined to the Romantic school of thought and feeling and this tendency, much developed in the studio of Ludwig Schnorr von Caroldfeld, was still more so by his Catholic education. After a journey to Rome, the painting of frescoes at Carlsruhe, and a short stay at Frankfort, he came in1847 to Munich where Cornelius gained great influence over him. The spirit of his art is that of the minnesingers, of Eichendorff, and of Bretano. The material upon which he worked was nature and life, especially child-life, lyrically and poetically conceived, drawing and painting in water-colors being the mediums in which he best expressed his thoughts. Among his fellow artists Richter and Steinle stand probably in the closest relation to him. He set a high value on religious painting, and though he thought it less suited to his talents, he did not neglect it altogether. In the castle on the Wartburg he painted fine frescoes of the works of mercy and the life of St. Elizabeth, which recall the early Renais-sance; he also painted there the history of the Thuringian rulers and the Sangerkrieg. The work for the altar of the Church of Our Lady at Munich is splendid in tone and the colored cartoons for painted windows which were executed at Oxford and London are also greatly esteemed. At Carlsruhe he adorned the academy of art with entertaining frescoes characterizing art. The easel-picture "Ritter Kurts's Search for a Wife" had gained the commission for him, for the delightful humor of his popular creations is not spoiled by flippancy. Other excellent easel-pictures are in the Schack gallery at Munich. In his oil-paintings, however, the harmonious combination of the parts with the whole and of the color with the drawing are often lacking. In the frescoes the professional water-color painter is evident. As a water-color painter he attained his greatest triumphs in the cyclus of the Seven Ravens, and in that of the legend of Melusine.

G. GIETMANN


discuss this article | send to a friend

Discussion on 'Moritz von Schwind'











prev: Schwenckfeldians Schwenckfeldians Science and the Church next: Science and the Church

Report translation problem

*Description: Copy and paste the phrase with the problem or describe how the trascription can be fixed.
  * denotes required field
Severity:

Featured

Art Gallery
Art Gallery

Catholic Q & A


Popular Subjects
Top 20 Questions

Ask A Faith Question

Quotable Catholics RSS

"If I am right, Thy grace impart still in the right to stay. If I am wrong, Oh, teach my heart to find the better way."
-- Elizabeth Ann Seton, Saint, foundress and first superior of the Sisters of Charity; in personal prayer just before her conversion to the Catholic faith from Anglicanism

Donations

Latest OCE Discussion



Your usage constitutes agreement with User License :: Permissions :: Copyright © 2014, Catholic Answers.
Site last updated Aug 12, 2013