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Hilda, Saint

Abbess, b. 614; d. 680

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* Published by Encyclopedia Press, 1913.

Hilda (or HILD), Saint, Abbess, b. 614; d. 680. Practically speaking, all our knowledge of St. Hilda is derived from the pages of Bede. She was the daughter of Hereric, the nephew of King Edwin of Northumbria, and she seems like her great-uncle to have become a Christian through the preaching of St. Paul-inns about the year 627, when she was thirteen yearsold. Moved by the example of her sister Hereswith, who, after marrying Ethelhere of East Anglia, became a nun at Chelles in Gaul, Hilda also journeyed to East Anglia, intending to follow her sister abroad. But St. Aidan recalled her to her own country, and after leading a monastic life for a while en the north bank of the Wear and afterwards at Hertlepool, where she ruled a double monastery of monks and nuns with great success, Hilda eventually undertook to set in order a monastery at Streaneshalch, a place to which the Danes a century or two later gave the name of Whitby. Under the rule of St. Hilda the monastery at Whitby became very famous. The Sacred Scriptures were specially studied there, and no less than five of the inmates became bishops, St. John, Bishop of Hexham, and still more St. Wilfrid, Bishop of York, rendering untold service to the Anglo-Saxon Church at this critical period of the struggle with paganism. Here, in 664, was held the important synod at which King Oswy, convinced by the arguments of St. Wilfrid, decided the observance of Easter and other moot. points. St. Hilda herself later on seems to have sided with Theodore against Wilfrid. The fame of St. Hilda's wisdom was so great that from far and near monks and even royal personages came to consult her. Seven years before her death the saint was stricken down with a grievous fever which never left her till she breathed her last, but, in spite of this, she neglected none of her duties to God or to her subjects. She passed away most peacefully after receiving the Holy Viaticum, and the tolling of the monastery bell was heard miraculously at Hackness thirteen miles away, where also a devout nun named Begu saw the soul of St. Hilda borne to heaven by angels. With St. Hilda is intimately connected the story of Caedmon (q.v.), the sacred bard. When he was brought before St. Hilda she admitted him to take monastic vows in her monastery, where he most piously died.. The cultus of St. Hilda from an early period is attested. by the inclusion of her name in the calendar of St.. Willibrord, written at the beginning of the eighth. century. It was alleged at a later date that the remains of St. Hilda were translated to Glastonbury by King Edmund (Malmesbury, "Gesta Pont.", 198); but. this is only part of the "great Glastonbury myth" (see Stubbs, "Memorials of St. Dunstan", p. cxvi). Another story states that St. Edmund brought her relics to Gloucester. St. Hilda's feast seems to have been kept on November 17. There are a dozen or more old English churches dedicated to St. Hilda on the northeast coast and South Shields is probably a corruption of St. Hilda.

HERBERT THURSTON


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