Catholic Answers

Search Articles


Navigation

Search Scans
Scans by volume
Random Article
Login - advanced access

Collections

1,001 Saints
List of Popes
Art Gallery
Map Room
RSS Feeds RSS

Curricula

Apologetics
Art
Catechetics
Christology
Church Hierarchy
Church History - to 1517 A.D.
Education
Ethics
Hagiography - saints
Homiletics - sermons
Mariology - on Mary
Patrology
Philosophy
Religious Orders
Sacred Scripture
Science

Front Matter — Vol I

Title Page
Copyright & Imprimatur
To the Knights of Columbus
Preface
Contributors
Tables of Abbreviations

Site Status

Articles:11,552
Images:42,348
Links:183,872
Updated:  Aug 12, 2013
prev: Pierre-Lamberts Goossens Pierre-Lamberts Goossens Gordianus and Epimachus, Saints next: Gordianus and Epimachus, Saints

Gordian

Three Roman emperors of this name, who reigned between A.D. 237-44,

High Resolution Scan ———————————

Login or register to access high resolution scans and other advanced features.

Registration is Free!

Errata* for Gordian:
———————————

Login or register to access the errata and other advanced features.

Registration is Free!


————
* Published by Encyclopedia Press, 1913.


Gordian (Lat. GORDIANUS).—There were three Roman emperors of this name, who reigned between A.D. 237-44, and all of whom met with violent deaths. The first, Marcus Antonius Africanus Gordianus, descended on the fathers side from the Gracchi and on the mothers from Trajan, was chosen emperor in Africa in opposition to the usurper Maximin, and the choice was confirmed by the Senate. On account of his advanced age, his son was associated with him in the purple. Their regin lasted only thirty-six days, the son being slain in battle by Maximins lieutenant, Capellianus, and the father putting an end to his own life (July, 237). M. Antonius Gordianus Pius, the grandson of the elder and nephew of the younger Gordian, a boy of thirteen, was appointed to the dignity of Caesar under the joint-emperors Maximus and Balbinus. These latter were massacred in 238 by the Praetorian guards, and the youthful Gordian became sole emperor. After being for a time under the control of his mother's eunuchs, he married the daughter of Misitheus, his teacher of rhetoric. Misitheus proved to be a capable politician and general, and 'stirred up his young charge to march in person against the Persians. At first the expedition met with success, but the death of Misitheus put an end to Gordian's prosperity. His soldiers mutinied, at the instigation of Philip, the successor of Misitheus, and slew him (244). Under the Gordians the Church enjoyed peace. Their rival, Maximin, had been a fierce persecutor of the Christians; hence they naturally cultivated the goodwill of those who had every reason to oppose his rule.

T. B. SCANNELL


discuss this article | send to a friend

Discussion on 'Gordian'











prev: Pierre-Lamberts Goossens Pierre-Lamberts Goossens Gordianus and Epimachus, Saints next: Gordianus and Epimachus, Saints

Report translation problem

*Description: Copy and paste the phrase with the problem or describe how the trascription can be fixed.
  * denotes required field
Severity:

Featured

Art Gallery
Art Gallery

Catholic Q & A


Popular Subjects
Top 20 Questions

Ask A Faith Question

Quotable Catholics RSS

"Those who belong to God and Jesus Christ ally themselves with the bishop."
-- Ignatius, Saint, Bishop of Antioch, martyr, and disciple of John; writing to the Philadelphians (Philad, iii, 2) circa A.D. 100, insisting on the necessity of unity with the bishop (from the article "Schism").

Donations

Latest OCE Discussion



Your usage constitutes agreement with User License :: Permissions :: Copyright © 2014, Catholic Answers.
Site last updated Aug 12, 2013