Catholic Answers

Search Articles


Navigation

Search Scans
Scans by volume
Random Article
Login - advanced access

Collections

1,001 Saints
List of Popes
Art Gallery
Map Room
RSS Feeds RSS

Curricula

Apologetics
Art
Catechetics
Christology
Church Hierarchy
Church History - to 1517 A.D.
Education
Ethics
Hagiography - saints
Homiletics - sermons
Mariology - on Mary
Patrology
Philosophy
Religious Orders
Sacred Scripture
Science

Front Matter — Vol I

Title Page
Copyright & Imprimatur
To the Knights of Columbus
Preface
Contributors
Tables of Abbreviations

Site Status

Articles:11,552
Images:42,348
Links:183,872
Updated:  Aug 12, 2013
prev: Daughters of the Cross (France) Daughters of the Cross (France) Virgin of Cuyo next: Virgin of Cuyo

Daughters of the Holy Cross

Also called the Sisters of St. Andrew

High Resolution Scan ———————————

Login or register to access high resolution scans and other advanced features.

Registration is Free!

Errata* for Daughters of the Holy Cross:
———————————

Login or register to access the errata and other advanced features.

Registration is Free!


————
* Published by Encyclopedia Press, 1913.


Cross, DAUGHTERS OF THE HOLY, also called the SISTERS OF ST. ANDREW. The aim of this congregation is to instruct poor country girls, to provide refuges for the young exposed to temptation, to prepare the sick for death, and to care for churches. The sisters make yearly vows for five years, after which the vows are perpetual. The congregation, which is subject to diocesan control, was established at Guinnetiere, near Bethines, in the Diocese of Vienne, France, in 1806. In December, 1811, the mother-house was erected at Maille, and six years later the constitutions were approved by Msgr. de Beauregard, Bishop of Montauban. Government recognition was granted in 1819 and renewed in 1826. In 1820 the foundress purchased the ancient abbey at La Puye, which then became the headquarters of the institute. In 1839 Pius VIII granted many indulgences and spiritual favors to the members. The establishment of a branch at Issy, near Paris, in 1817 under the protection of the royal family, helped to develop the congregation, which spread rapidly, and foundations were made at Parma in 1851 under ducal patronage, and at Rome in 1856. At the time of the dispersion of the French orders in 1905, the Sisters of St. Andrew had 400 houses in France, 9 in Italy, and O in Spain, with a membership of over 3000 nuns. The two founders of the congregation were: Andre-Hubert Fournet, Vicar-General of Poitiers, b. at Maille on December 6, 1752; educated at Chatelleraud and Poitiers; ordained 1778; who died at La Puye on May 13, 1834; and Jeanne-Marie-Elizabeth-Lucie Bichier des Ages, born near Le Blanc, Indre, on July 3, 1772; she had been a prisoner for the Faith during the Revolution, and died at La Puye on August 26, 1838.

A. A. MACERLEAN


discuss this article | send to a friend

Discussion on 'Daughters of the Holy Cross'











prev: Daughters of the Cross (France) Daughters of the Cross (France) Virgin of Cuyo next: Virgin of Cuyo

Report translation problem

*Description: Copy and paste the phrase with the problem or describe how the trascription can be fixed.
  * denotes required field
Severity:

Featured

Art Gallery
Art Gallery

Catholic Q & A


Popular Subjects
Top 20 Questions

Ask A Faith Question

Quotable Catholics RSS

"Bless us, O Lord, and these Thy gifts..."
-- From the Gelasian Sacramentary (7th century A.D.); a benediction retained up to the present day in our short grace before meals.

Donations

Latest OCE Discussion



Your usage constitutes agreement with User License :: Permissions :: Copyright © 2014, Catholic Answers.
Site last updated Aug 12, 2013