Catholic Answers

Search Articles


Navigation

Search Scans
Scans by volume
Random Article
Login - advanced access

Collections

1,001 Saints
List of Popes
Art Gallery
Map Room
RSS Feeds RSS

Curricula

Apologetics
Art
Catechetics
Christology
Church Hierarchy
Church History - to 1517 A.D.
Education
Ethics
Hagiography - saints
Homiletics - sermons
Mariology - on Mary
Patrology
Philosophy
Religious Orders
Sacred Scripture
Science

Front Matter — Vol I

Title Page
Copyright & Imprimatur
To the Knights of Columbus
Preface
Contributors
Tables of Abbreviations

Site Status

Articles:11,552
Images:42,348
Links:183,872
Updated:  Aug 12, 2013
prev: Lights Lights Lilienfeld next: Lilienfeld

Abbey of Liguge

Benedictine Abbey, in the Diocese of Poitiers, France, founded around 360 by St. Martin of Tours

High Resolution Scan ———————————

Login or register to access high resolution scans and other advanced features.

Registration is Free!

Errata* for Abbey of Liguge:
———————————

Login or register to access the errata and other advanced features.

Registration is Free!


————
* Published by Encyclopedia Press, 1913.


Liguge, a Benedictine Abbey, in the Diocese of Poitiers, France, was founded about the year A.D. 360, by St. Martin of Tours. The miracles and reputation of the holy founder attracted a large number of disciples to the new monastery. When however, St. Martin became Bishop of Tours and established the monastery of Marmoutiers a short distance from that city, the fame of Liguge declined considerably. Among St. Martin's successors as abbots of Liguge may be mentioned St. Savin, who resigned the post of abbot to become a hermit, and Abbot Ursinus, during whose reign the monk Defensor compiled the well-known "Scintillarum Liber" printed in P.L., LXXXVIII. The Saracenic invasion, the wars of the dukes of Aquitaine and the early Carlovingians, and lastly the Norman invasion were a series of disasters that almost destroyed the monastery. By the eleventh century it had sunk to the position of a dependent priory attached to the Abbey of Maillezais, and finally reached the lowest level as a benefice in commendam. One of the commendatory priors, Geoffrey d'Estissac, a great patron of literature and the friend of Rabelais, built the existing church, a graceful structure but smaller by far than the ancient basilica which it replaced. In 1607 Liguge ceased to be a monastery and was annexed to the Jesuit college of Poitiers to which institution it served as a country house until the suppression of the society in 1762. At the French Revolution the buildings and lands were sold as national property, the church being used for some time as the Municipal Council chamber. Eventually, when the upheaval of the Revolution had subsided, the building was constituted a parish church.

In 1849 the famous Msgr. Pie, afterwards cardinal, became Bishop of Poitiers. This prelate was the intimate friend of Dom Prosper Gueranger, refounder of the French Benedictine Congregation of monks, and in 1852 he established at Liguge a colony of monks from Solesmes. In 1864 the priory was erected into an abbey by Pope Pius IX, and Dom Leon Bastide was appointed first abbot. When, in 1880, the monks were driven from their cloister as a result of the "Ferry laws", many of them retired under Dom Bourigaud, the successor of Dom Bastide, to the monastery of Silos in Spain which was saved from extinction by the recruits thus received. Some years later the buildings at Liguge were sold to a syndicate, civil in its constitution, by which they were leased to the abbot and community who thus entered their monastery once more. Novices now came in considerable numbers and, in 1894, the ancient Abbey of St. Wandrille de Fontenelle in the Diocese of Rouen was repeopled by a colony from Liguge. In 1902 the community were again driven out by the "Association Laws", and they are now settled in Belgium at Chevetoigne, in the Diocese of Namur. On Dom Bourigaud's resignation, in 1907, Dom Leopold Gaugain was elected abbot. The community now numbers about forty choir monks and ten lay brothers.

G. ROGER HUDLESTON


discuss this article | send to a friend

Discussion on 'Abbey of Liguge'











prev: Lights Lights Lilienfeld next: Lilienfeld

Report translation problem

*Description: Copy and paste the phrase with the problem or describe how the trascription can be fixed.
  * denotes required field
Severity:

Featured

Art Gallery
Art Gallery

Catholic Q & A


Popular Subjects
Top 20 Questions

Ask A Faith Question

Quotable Catholics RSS

"I forgive you as heartily as I wish God to forgive me."
-- Marie-Anne Piedcourt (Sister of Jesus Crucified), choir-nun; to her executioner, on mounting the scaffold; one of the 16 Teresian Martyrs of Compiegne guillotined on July 17, 1794 in Paris during the murderous Reign of Terror.

Donations

Latest OCE Discussion



Your usage constitutes agreement with User License :: Permissions :: Copyright © 2014, Catholic Answers.
Site last updated Aug 12, 2013